My thanks to those.....
Posted by: Monkey1 (IP Logged)
Date: 28 March, 2020 18:03

..... who stay at home, and my thanks to those who keep working.

My first trip out for a food shop today, good old Morrisons in Morpeth being my closest. Hats off to the whole blessed crew who make that shop work. It has been superbly organised in a short period of time when things such as signs (I can see why so many of my customers are still working) barriers, trolley cleaning, roped off queue systems, must be difficult to get hold of & distribute around the country.

Roads were empty, a few lone cyclists getting their exercise unlike the lunacy seen on Tuesday, a few people out getting some exercise or walking dogs, not the hundreds of before. The people in the queue for the shop were patient, except for the horrible woman behind us. She made it quite clear that she thought the whole thing ridiculous, having to be told to keep back, huffing & puffing when told to wait. I assume she is exactly the sort of person likely to contract this thing by ignoring the advice, then spread it around others. Be warned folks, there are people like that out there, but everyone else I saw were just getting on with it & trying to do the right thing.

I phoned a former neighbour from when I lived in town to see if she needed anything from the shop, an excuse for a chat too because she is living on her own & not able to go out at all. We also did the shop for the aged in-laws who are similarly imprisoned & dropped that off which was a weird experience, stuff left on doorsteps. They managed to give us an absolute ton of paracetamol in return however, leftover & never used from a prescription a while ago & now much appreciated because Her Ladyship has cricked her neck & used our entire little supply, none in the shops.

We came back via Rothbury, a ghost town if ever there was one. A paramedic was hoofing it in the opposite direction, blue lights flashing. They are going to be kept busy I imagine.

With everything pretty much shut down, I have huge respect and huge thanks for all those who have to keep working to make the country function while the rest of us are shut away out of sight. It must be creepy, frightening, hard, and I have no doubt that I have the easier of the two situations by staying at home. It makes you realise just how many people in walks of life you might not think about, are essential to keeping the rest of us supplied with stuff & provided with services.

Just one of a huge potential number of examples being people who service printers. The NHS itself has an insane number of printers, somebody once told me a figure and it is mind boggling, and without them the whole place will stop functioning, so spare a thought for those who have to go into hospitals, the worst places to be right now, and into other places that have to keep going, to keep the printers running.

So if you are one of those who goes out to work because what you do is necessary, no matter what walk of life, I say thank you. If you are one of those who stays at home so that these people are troubled as little as possible, I also say thank you.

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: Rafpilot2000 (IP Logged)
Date: 28 March, 2020 20:47

Monkey , great piece ! My wife is an intensive care nurse and has been treating covid patients all week and I have been busy flying too so hoping to actually enjoy a beer tonight for the first time this week.

Itís particularly tough for my good lady but her and the rest of the healthcare staff are incredibly grateful for how well people have taken the isolation advice onboard. Itís certainly saving lives which is so critical.

For us though itís pretty much business as usual going to work so from the other side of the fence we are sending all those in isolation our very best wishes , as even with netflix and sky, being stuck at home must be frustrating and very hard as it goes against our nature as sociable creatures.

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: dick g (IP Logged)
Date: 29 March, 2020 08:59

This is a bit OT, but as this forum is part of the way of retaining a grip, I post it all the same. It might interest Rafpilot. Re-arranging family photos the other day, I looked for some at one of my dad in the uniform of the Royal Flying Corps in WW1. He was a mechanic and took part in the first parade of the newly-formed RAF in 1918 when the blue uniform - made from an undelivered batch of cloth intended for the Czarist cavalry - was worn for the first time. It is the face of someone who lived through the great Spanish Flu pandemic. And the Depression and another World War. His generation knew how to tough things out.

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: Rafpilot2000 (IP Logged)
Date: 29 March, 2020 11:39

Lol, it is somewhat ironic that our uniform colour comes originally from the Russians who keep us on our toes even in these times.
Itís also rather amusing that the raf was formed on April Fools day !
We do look back to that generation with admiration of their stoicism and mentality. That said , it was a very different time with far fewer people, a younger age demographic, poor healthcare and a completely different way of life. The battle we face each day at the moment is massive , and every bit as brutal as that which was faced a century ago. I think the actions we take and follow in the next few weeks will be talked about for decades. Those of us who are biting the bullet and isolating will be able to have a beer and look back heads held high and those who stockpiled toilet role and decided to ignore the guidance no doubt ridiculed.
Everything will change, be it from the shops that shut to the different attitude to the NHS which has been taken for granted and abused for years. Indeed the usual trade of worried well and alcoholics abusing the staff appears to have dried up with the outbreak of CV-19.
The challenge facing the Falcons as a club is huge , and we certainly wish everyone associated with the club , from the cleaners to the players well. My hope is that financial support will materialise from Somewhere in a timely manner to protect the club and ensure we are rightly playing premiership rugby next seasons. Maybe in the distant future we could offer NHS staff entry to match free or similar but for now I just hope the pennies donít run out.
Maybe early release of the new shirt or similar to allow us to start pumping revenue into the club again.
Regardless it will certainly give us a talking point in the stands for next season and many seasons to come!

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: SimonG19 (IP Logged)
Date: 29 March, 2020 11:41

Quote:
dick g
This is a bit OT, but as this forum is part of the way of retaining a grip, I post it all the same. It might interest Rafpilot. Re-arranging family photos the other day, I looked for some at one of my dad in the uniform of the Royal Flying Corps in WW1. He was a mechanic and took part in the first parade of the newly-formed RAF in 1918 when the blue uniform - made from an undelivered batch of cloth intended for the Czarist cavalry - was worn for the first time. It is the face of someone who lived through the great Spanish Flu pandemic. And the Depression and another World War. His generation knew how to tough things out.

Someone I was talking to the other day (on the phone of course) was saying it must be like it was during the war but at least we aren't being bombed by anyone. Small mercies.

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: limpopo (IP Logged)
Date: 29 March, 2020 12:28

Quote:
SimonG19
Quote:
dick g
This is a bit OT, but as this forum is part of the way of retaining a grip, I post it all the same. It might interest Rafpilot. Re-arranging family photos the other day, I looked for some at one of my dad in the uniform of the Royal Flying Corps in WW1. He was a mechanic and took part in the first parade of the newly-formed RAF in 1918 when the blue uniform - made from an undelivered batch of cloth intended for the Czarist cavalry - was worn for the first time. It is the face of someone who lived through the great Spanish Flu pandemic. And the Depression and another World War. His generation knew how to tough things out.

Someone I was talking to the other day (on the phone of course) was saying it must be like it was during the war but at least we aren't being bombed by anyone. Small mercies.

Many have said this and it is understandable, but I lived in the war in Hull and this is nothing like it thankfully. Meager rations, bombing nightly during the first three years and although Hull was never mentioned by name only as "a North East Coast Town!" it was the second most bombed City in England outside London. 90 per cent of its buildings damaged. 86,000 houses were damaged, and by the end of the war, 152,000 people had been left homeless. No I am happy to say that it we have left all that behind.

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: dick g (IP Logged)
Date: 29 March, 2020 13:32

Quote:
SimonG19
Quote:
dick g
This is a bit OT, but as this forum is part of the way of retaining a grip, I post it all the same. It might interest Rafpilot. Re-arranging family photos the other day, I looked for some at one of my dad in the uniform of the Royal Flying Corps in WW1. He was a mechanic and took part in the first parade of the newly-formed RAF in 1918 when the blue uniform - made from an undelivered batch of cloth intended for the Czarist cavalry - was worn for the first time. It is the face of someone who lived through the great Spanish Flu pandemic. And the Depression and another World War. His generation knew how to tough things out.

Someone I was talking to the other day (on the phone of course) was saying it must be like it was during the war but at least we aren't being bombed by anyone. Small mercies.

Fully understand these sentiments. But the differences between the Covid 19 War and WW2 is that during the air-raids my mum and dad knew what was coming and head for the shelter. Strategically, it was a matter of preparing to resist invasion. The foe was known and recognisable. And they weren't around 24/7.

With Covid, the enemy is in our midst. And it is invisible. And silent. And everywhere.

So which experience was/is worse?

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: SimonG19 (IP Logged)
Date: 29 March, 2020 14:26

Quote:
dick g
Quote:
SimonG19
Quote:
dick g
This is a bit OT, but as this forum is part of the way of retaining a grip, I post it all the same. It might interest Rafpilot. Re-arranging family photos the other day, I looked for some at one of my dad in the uniform of the Royal Flying Corps in WW1. He was a mechanic and took part in the first parade of the newly-formed RAF in 1918 when the blue uniform - made from an undelivered batch of cloth intended for the Czarist cavalry - was worn for the first time. It is the face of someone who lived through the great Spanish Flu pandemic. And the Depression and another World War. His generation knew how to tough things out.

Someone I was talking to the other day (on the phone of course) was saying it must be like it was during the war but at least we aren't being bombed by anyone. Small mercies.

Fully understand these sentiments. But the differences between the Covid 19 War and WW2 is that during the air-raids my mum and dad knew what was coming and head for the shelter. Strategically, it was a matter of preparing to resist invasion. The foe was known and recognisable. And they weren't around 24/7.

With Covid, the enemy is in our midst. And it is invisible. And silent. And everywhere.

So which experience was/is worse?

There again they could have come out of the shelter to find they were homeless.

Which was/is worse? Both horrendous.

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: Leipziger (IP Logged)
Date: 29 March, 2020 17:22

Right now is a crazy and worrying, and maybe some others are having different experiences to me here in our little village in which you wouldn't notice anything is wrong (one COVID-19 case I've heard of, and he has recovered). But I can't imagine this compares to being in an air raid shelter worrying about whether you and your family and friends will survive the night and even if you do, whether you will have a home to go back to. And of course, you'll probably have to just do the same again tomorrow night. On a lot less food, without central heating and indoor bathrooms.

As a furloughed worker and very proud husband-of-a-hospital-worker, thank you to Rafpilot and Mrs Rafpilot, and everyone else who is out there working to keep us who are at home, safe and healthy.

Stay safe everyone.

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: Osric (IP Logged)
Date: 30 March, 2020 19:08

Echo the sentiments. Let's hope the nation's relationship with the NHS doesn't change and people who can't hold their drink no longer think it acceptable to verbally/physically assault staff and what you rightly call the worried well don't go running to the GP every time they have a cold that lasts more than a day.

My partner, a GP, goes to work every day at the moment worried for her many vulnerable patients who have genuine medical need, yet still receives utterly pointless calls on her time ( someone trying to access a GP to ask how to access NHS 111 for example ). This is a task made more difficult by the fact that three of her partners, medics who had no PPE worth the name, now have Covid 19.

Many thanks to all those, NHS and otherwise, who are keeping things going. It is much appreciated.

Best of luck too to all the Falcons family and here's to happier times. 🥂

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: Rafpilot2000 (IP Logged)
Date: 30 March, 2020 19:47

Itís certainly interesting to see how people react to the current situation. For many itís a genuine struggle , Whereís others seem stoic and manage it with a level of grim acceptance . I think we all miss the basic things right now and miss more than ever sitting/standing in the terraces at Kingston Park. I have to confess that despite being classed as a Key Worker , I feel somewhat of a fraud compared to the efforts of the emergency services and particular the Health workers at present .
That said I was left somewhat saddened the other day when my good lady returned from a 12 hour shift working with two cv-19 positive patients. Apparently the local branch of Hotel Chocolat (that posh stuff you get for Christmas) brought some of their stock in as a thank you for the nurses which was a really lovely gesture. Unfortunately the nurses were too busy in PPE looking after the poor patients to have any and the office workers Who donít go near the patients took the lot. My wife was unphased by it and simply appreciated the gesture , so the kind words of people on here are very much appreciated. She has however said she looks forward to a few pints at the rugby when it kicks off again!!

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: dksniper (IP Logged)
Date: 30 March, 2020 20:52

Agree with you all. Im a retired Detective that now works as a medical receptionist at a busy GP surgery. Ive had more abuse in the surgery than in 30 yrs in the Police Service (verbal anyway!!). Its amazing how attitudes have changed this last week. I think the NHS will be more appreciated after this nightmare. Just returned to work today after 1wk isolation after developing symptoms.
Im surprised at the office staff rafpilot, anything here gets shared out equally.
My symptoms were mild and I was flattened for a few days, Im 59 but reasonably fit, played two full games this season and coach regularly and it floored me with just mild symptoms. Please take social distancing seriously.
Be safe everyone.

Re: My thanks to those.....
Posted by: aidanb (IP Logged)
Date: 30 March, 2020 21:32

What is apparent in these difficult times is that there are people who access a GP surgery because they have not a lot else to do.

I am amazed at the number of lovely messages our surgery has received and also stunned at the one or two who think telling us to have sex in a far off land is appropriate.

But mostly I am grateful that we have a primary care system which has reacted to this situation with thought effort and care. Primary Care has re shaped itself in order to ensure our patients are dealt with safely (not passing infection to us and the other way across as well). Can you imagine going in to your place of work wondering if a patient you are providing care for will pass something to you which could make you very very ill / and for that also to be the other way in the case of some of our more physically vulnerable patients.

But my main point in emphasising the two way relationship is that it is a two way street for us all.

If we all behave responsibly then we can get on top of this and bring our lives back to some normality.

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